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Japan, EU to launch dialogue on cybersecurity- draft


Tokyo,Japan and the European Union (EU) will agree to launch a dialogue to boost cybersecurity next month amid suspected cyber attacks from Chinese entities. 

Japan's Prime Minister Shinzo Abe and European Union leaders will launch a dialogue to boost cybersecurity at a summit in Brussels on May 7, according to a draft of a statement to be issued after the meeting. With China as a suspected source of cyber attacks in mind, the draft of the joint press statement, says, "Facing more severe, widespread and globalised risks surrounding cyberspace...Protection of a safe, open and secure cyberspace is needed." 

Abe and the EU leaders, European Council President Herman Van Rompuy and European Commission President Jose Manuel Barroso will also agree to hold an inaugural meeting of a Japan-EU dialogue on the stable use of outer space in the latter half of this year in Tokyo, the draft says. Regarding cyberattacks as a new type of threat to national security, Japan said in its National Security Strategy adopted in December that it will strengthen information sharing and promote cyberspace defense cooperation with relevant countries. In the first meeting of the Japan-EU Space Policy Dialogue, the two sides are expected to discuss cooperation toward the creation of international norms that will help reduce space debris caused by anti-satellite tests, satellite collisions and other reasons. 

"We affirm the importance of safety, security and sustainability of outer space activities," the draft statement says. There have been growing calls for the crafting of international norms on outer space activities since China destroyed one of its ageing satellites via a missile-driven, anti-satellite test in 2007, creating a mess of fragments fluttering through space and sparking concern that such debris could seriously damage other satellites in nearby orbit. 

In the summit, Abe and the EU leaders will reaffirm their shared view that international disputes and issues "should be resolved peacefully and in accordance with international law, not by force or coercion," the draft says.